There’s also a women’s version (Women’s Rogaine Foam) — but a three-month supply costs $22 more online. The only difference between the two products are the instructions; women are instructed to apply once a day instead of twice. If you’re a woman who doesn’t feel like paying extra for marketing, the men’s product will suffice. A cheaper generic version is Kirkland Signature Minoxidil Foam, but with a longer history on the market and more customer testimonials, Rogaine is our first choice.


The Rogaine rep we spoke to explained that the different packaging (and therefore different prices) has to do with the FDA-approval process: “We discovered in clinical trials that the hair loss patterns between men and women are different,” she said by way of explanation. “Men typically have that bald spot on the crown of their head, where women generally have a general thinning throughout, but concentrated more on the top of the head. So for FDA approval, we had to come up with two different, gender-specific products, so the directions were more explanatory.”
Laser light therapy is not a baldness solution, and the HairMax takes a time commitment: You have to use the product for 15 minutes a day, three days a week and you have to keep using it indefinitely to get results. Still, laser light therapy has no major side effects, and may be best for men who have noticed some increased shedding and want to maintain more of the hair they have on their head.

According to Men’s Fitness, Minoxidil will help slow the hair loss process, preserve the hair you have, and regrow hair more quickly. The six month supply of unscented topical solution is clinically proven to help regrow hair and revitalize hair follicles. The easy-to-use application can be used once daily. Simply apply the solution along the scalp using the dropper.
One hard truth: Hair loss is mostly out of your control. “Baldness comes down to your genes,” says Frederick Joyce, M.D., founder of Rejuvenate! Med Spa and a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery. “If you have the baldness gene, there are some natural remedies that may make your hair stronger and healthier to slow your hair loss slightly—but they won’t prevent you from going bald. Still, maintaining hair health by eating well and using the right products—combined with medical-grade treatments—can really work all together to help you have a fuller, thicker head of hair.”
“I’m 43 years old and my hair has started to thin out a little bit. I started looking into a lot of these different products on the market that claim they can slow down balding in men and some of them even claim they can regrow your actual hair. As I went on the internet and started looking around, I kind of went down a rabbit hole into these different reviews and all sorts of different products from vitamins to topical solutions. Do any of these things do what they claim they can do?”
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There’s also a women’s version (Women’s Rogaine Foam) — but a three-month supply costs $22 more online. The only difference between the two products are the instructions; women are instructed to apply once a day instead of twice. If you’re a woman who doesn’t feel like paying extra for marketing, the men’s product will suffice. A cheaper generic version is Kirkland Signature Minoxidil Foam, but with a longer history on the market and more customer testimonials, Rogaine is our first choice.

I'll start by saying I actually don't have a serious hair loss problem. However, I have always had calics along my hairline, so I wanted to fill them in a little before my sister's wedding. I started using this product about a month ago. I hate that it never seems to dry, so I ended up throwing my hair in a slick bun to hide the sticky look on a number of occasions. But just last week a coworker pointed out that my hairline was filling in, which is when I finally realized that it was working! The wedding is over, but I plan on using it over the course of the next three months to see if I can obtain more permanent results. So far I'm pleased, but the results take time and it's a little pricier than I would like to admit. The twice a day thing is kind of a pain in the arse.
The easy-to-use spray bottle allows you to apply the serum directly to your scalp, or you can spray it onto your hands to rub into parts of your scalp. Each bottle offers a three month supply and should be used twice daily. It has outstanding reviews online, partly because it does not leave a sticky residue or cause preliminary hair shedding like most other regrowth treatments.
Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.
The causes behind other types of hair loss -- including alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, anagen effluvium and traction alopecia -- and their treatment can be dramatically different. Hair loss is best treated in association with its underlying cause; therefore, it's recommend to seek medical help. Abnormal hair loss can also be a symptom of a more serious disease -- early diagnosis is strongly suggested in these cases.
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Like minoxidil, finasteride, the active ingredient in Propecia, was originally created with a different purpose in mind -- to treat enlarged prostate glands -- and researchers observed it came with a side effect of hair growth. Unlike topical minoxidil, finasteride requires a prescription, is taken orally and addresses hormonal causes of hair loss. It inhibits the enzyme type II 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into DHT. As it was the first truly effective treatment for hair loss that provided nearly guaranteed results, finasteride revolutionized the hair-loss-treatment industry.
PRP for Hair Growth has become one of the most exciting recent breakthroughs in hair restoration, and is not only showing positive results as a stand-alone treatment, it has proved to be a valuable tool during hair transplantation as well. During the transplant process, PRP has been shown to strengthen non-transplanted hair, minimize donor scarring and accelerate wound healing. In addition, PRP has also been reported to improve graft survival and accelerate the growth of the transplanted hair.
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.

Warnings For external use only Flammable: Keep away from fire or flame Do not use if your degree of hair loss is different than that shown on the side of this carton, because this product may not work for you you have no family history of hair loss your hair loss is sudden and/or patchy your hair loss is associated with childbirth you do not know the reason for your hair loss you are under 18 years of age. Do not use on babies and children. your scalp is red, inflamed, infected, irritated, or painful. you use other medicines on the scalp.
In our research and our conversations with experts, one name kept popping up repeatedly: Rogaine. As the first topical brand FDA-approved to help regrow hair (all the way back in 1988), Rogaine benefits from more than 20 years of clinical trials and consumer feedback. Rogaine was the first brand to offer a 5 percent minoxidil foam solution when it debuted Men’s Rogaine Unscented Foam in 2006, and virtually every treatment developed since (for both men and women) has been an imitation or derivation of that formula.
If you do decide to start treatment to save your hair, a good place to start is with minoxidil, more commonly known as Rogaine. Don’t expect this hair-loss treatment to create luscious locks; minoxidil is better at slowing down or preventing more loss rather than promoting hair growth. But, according to Dr. Amy McMichael, professor and chair of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Department of Dermatology, it is effective “if used as recommended, with evidence of improvement seen around six to nine months.” Simply massage the foam or solution into your scalp once or twice daily, and for best results, use a formula with 5 percent concentration.
Our other recommendation is the HairMax Ultima 12 LaserComb. The comb uses low-level lasers to stimulate hair follicles and modulate dihydrotestosterone (DHT) — a hormone that causes the most common type of hair loss. While it sounds like something from a sci-fi movie, the treatment works, and the dermatologists we consulted reported that their patients saw thicker and longer hair when combined with our top pick. The only catch: The comb isn’t as effective as minoxidil treatments, and at nearly $400, it’s a much bigger investment. Still, it’s the best option if you’re looking for a non-invasive, non-chemical treatment.

What should I be using for early stages of hair loss? I have some thinning around my crown. It’s not too bad, but it’s obviously not going to get any better. Should I just be using a shampoo for hairloss, or more serious measures like Reganine or Fin tablets etc? I don’t mind, but I don’t want to use products that could somehow make the situation worse. Thanks.

In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
There’s also a women’s version (Women’s Rogaine Foam) — but a three-month supply costs $22 more online. The only difference between the two products are the instructions; women are instructed to apply once a day instead of twice. If you’re a woman who doesn’t feel like paying extra for marketing, the men’s product will suffice. A cheaper generic version is Kirkland Signature Minoxidil Foam, but with a longer history on the market and more customer testimonials, Rogaine is our first choice.
Every woman desires thick, long, and lustrous hair. From teenagers to oldies, everyone loves their hair because of the pivotal role it plays in defining one’s face and looks. Luscious hair that has enough shine, length, and strength is what everyone tries to achieve. Unfortunately, hair fall, hair loss, and impaired hair growth are common hair issues that people face. Hectic lifestyles, pollution, and adulterated hair care products are to blame. If you want an effective, safe, and easy solution for your hair growth problems, this article can help you.

In clinical studies of mostly white women aged 18-45 years with mild to moderate degrees of hair loss, the following response to 2% minoxidil topical solution was reported: 19% of women reported moderate hair regrowth after using 2% minoxidil topical solution for 8 months (19% had moderate regrowth; 40% had minimal regrowth). This compares with 7% of women reporting moderate hair regrowth after using the placebo, the liquid without minoxidil in it, for 8 months (7% had moderate regrowth; 33% had minimal regrowth).
I’ve looked into taking finasteride. My father was prescribed it about 30 years ago for some minor prostate issues. After taking it for a year he said it had no effect on his hair regrowth. Do you think since it had no effect on my father, it will not effect me? I’m just a bit worried about giving it a shot after reading articles like this https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/finasteride-causes-physical-damage-to-nerves-depression-ed-steroid-imbalance.16979/#post-230383

Utilize caution when utilizing a compost tumbler, however, because hair does not appear to compost completely in them. Hair exists in a number of textures. Cutting the hair also might be an indication of mourning. Human hair is among those important things that form the idea of beauty. Human facial hair grows faster than every other hair physically.
A bathroom covered with loose strands or an ever-scrawnier ponytail can be startling but doesn't necessarily mean anything's wrong. By age 50, half of women will complain of hair loss. "As we age, overall hair density changes and individual strands become finer," says dermatologist Doris J. Day, MD. But just because thinning is natural doesn't mean you have to accept it. Here are 13 solutions to help you keep the hair out of your brush and on your head.

"I had my hair cut short a year ago for medical reasons and have been trying to grow it for the last 6 months but it was taking so long and seemed to get to a certain length and the stop. But after using your product my hair has grown so rapidly and is so much healthier now. So I wanted to thank you for developing this product which has helped to give me my confidence back."
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
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