P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.

For example, if your hair is thinning because you’ve recently started a new medication or a diet, your approach might be to take an oral supplement or use a laser light device. But if you have hair loss from psoriasis or chemical treatments, you might try a new shampoo and invest in a moisturizing scalp treatment. Throwing everything possible at the problem might not be the most effective method.
Beginning treatment as soon as possible after the hair loss begins gives the best results, because prolonged androgenetic alopecia may destroy many of the hair follicles. The use of anti-androgens after prolonged hair loss will help prevent further damage and encourage some hair regrowth from follicles that have been dormant but are still viable. Stopping treatment will result in the hair loss resuming if the androgens aren't kept in check in some other way. Maintaining your vitamin and mineral levels helps while you're on anti-androgen medications.
Domen, I was reading some articles and also the links you’ve provided in your other comments above – they say both Finesteride and Minoxidil only check further hair loss and thicken existing hair – but both can’t re-generate hair that’s already gone from bald spots. I guess the effectiveness of these 2 medications are quite proportionate to age of the native! At 42, I guess, I am old 🙁 Atleast according to Indian standards!!
Keranique Hair Regrowth 3-Piece Treatment Set for Women, Lipogaine for Women, Pantene Minoxidil 2% Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, Prominox 1 Hair Loss Shampoo, Prominox 2 Hair Loss Conditioner, Prominox 3 Hair Growth Stimulator, Prominox 6 Leave-In Hair Loss Conditioner, REDKEN Cerafil Retaliate 2% Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, Rogaine for Women Hair Regrowth Treatment

Results from clinical studies of mostly white women ages 18 to 45 years with mild to moderate degrees of hair loss report that after using minoxidil for eight months, 19% of users had moderate regrowth and 40% had minimal regrowth. Of those using a liquid without active minoxidil (a placebo) during the same time period, 7% reported moderate hair regrowth while 33% had minimal regrowth.

I'll start by saying I actually don't have a serious hair loss problem. However, I have always had calics along my hairline, so I wanted to fill them in a little before my sister's wedding. I started using this product about a month ago. I hate that it never seems to dry, so I ended up throwing my hair in a slick bun to hide the sticky look on a number of occasions. But just last week a coworker pointed out that my hairline was filling in, which is when I finally realized that it was working! The wedding is over, but I plan on using it over the course of the next three months to see if I can obtain more permanent results. So far I'm pleased, but the results take time and it's a little pricier than I would like to admit. The twice a day thing is kind of a pain in the arse.
“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
For those concerned that the existing treatments lack a certain sci-fi quality, behold the Laser Comb. The Laser Comb recently became only the third hair loss treatment to receive FDA approval. And it is the first that doesn’t use drugs or surgery. By stimulating follicles with a low-level laser, the hand-held device was shown in test trials to increase hair volume in a majority of patients.
As the name suggests, androgenetic alopecia involves the action of the hormones called androgens, which are essential for normal male sexual development and have other important functions in both sexes, including sex drive and regulation of hair growth. The condition may be inherited and involve several different genes. It can also result from an underlying endocrine condition, such as overproduction of androgen or an androgen-secreting tumor on the ovary, pituitary, or adrenal gland. In either case, the alopecia is likely related to increased androgen activity. But unlike androgenetic alopecia in men, in women the precise role of androgens is harder to determine. On the chance that an androgen-secreting tumor is involved, it's important to measure androgen levels in women with clear female pattern hair loss.
The most common side effects are itching and other skin irritations of the treated area of the scalp. Minoxidil topical solution 2% contains alcohol, which would cause burning or irritation of the eyes or sensitive skin areas. If minoxidil topical solution 2% accidentally gets into these areas, rinse with large amounts of cool tap water. Contact your doctor if irritation persists.
Women with androgenic alopecia may consider trying prescription ketoconazole at a strength of 2 percent. This drug comes in the form of a shampoo and also goes by the name Nizoral. It’s an antifungal agent and may help reduce the body’s production of testosterone and other androgens that lead to hair loss. You can also find 1 percent strength at your local pharmacy, but it may not be as effective.
Utilize caution when utilizing a compost tumbler, however, because hair does not appear to compost completely in them. Hair exists in a number of textures. Cutting the hair also might be an indication of mourning. Human hair is among those important things that form the idea of beauty. Human facial hair grows faster than every other hair physically.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).
Hair loss can be devastating for both men and women, even more so when there are loads of products on the market that don't work. According to the American Hair Loss Association (AHLA), two thirds of American men experience some degree of hair loss by the age of 35. By the age of 50, approximately 85 percent experience significantly thinning hair. Balding is commonly associated with aging, but for 25 percent of men the process begins before the age of 21. What's more, hair loss is not limited to men: The American Hair Loss Association reports that women make up about 40 percent of hair-loss sufferers in the United States.

"Firstly, even the very good ones won’t get to the root of the issue - pardon the pun - and prevent or treat male or female pattern baldness which is caused by genetics, nor deal with hormonal issues at the heart of female hair loss. But they can help make the hair you do have stronger and healthier. And they can be useful in putting a hair loss regime in place, along with medication like Minoxidil or Finasteride and/ or a hair transplant.

The follicles on the sides of the scalp are more genetically resistant to DHT, which is why male pattern baldness often results in a “crown” of hair. But its downsides are serious. “With women, finasteride is not an option,” says Dr. Wolfeld. “It’s not FDA-approved for women to take, so we don’t prescribe it.” In fact, due to the drug’s effect on hormone levels, pregnant women are advised to not even touch broken or crushed tablets.
Pay attention to the foods you eat and how much you’re eating. For example, eating a variety of whole foods that are rich in vitamins and minerals will help fuel your body and the areas responsible for hair regrowth. If you suspect you may be deficient in certain vitamins, visit your doctor to get a blood test and address other dietary issues, such as eating disorders or health conditions that might block nutrient absorption.
There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
What is your opinion on laser combs? I went to the Men’s Club yesterday and they recommended I spend ~$800 to buy a laser band, comb or hat. What is your opinion on how those work? Sounds like snake oil to me. They also recommended I go to my dermatologist to get a prescription to reduce sebum in my hair. I have been on Fin for 11 months, Minox foam 1x/day yet hair shed hasn’t stopped. I do have a prescription for Ketoconazole shampoo but rarely use it. I read in your article that this shampoo does help with Sebum build up so I will try that. Any other recommendations for sebum reduction?
Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.
Thank you. This has been the most helpful article I have read! Very much appreciated! Last question (I won’t bug you with anymore after this) . . . I was tested by my doctor and came out perfectly healthy so it is either stress or MPB. My job is extremely stressful so it could be that but I have no way or knowing for sure. As such, do you think there is any harm on me taking finasteride even if it isn’t MPB and is just stress? I suppose if the medicine didn’t work, I would know it was stress and not MPB. Also, I assume this is something I would continue to take for life right?
SOURCES: George Cotsarelis, MD, director, Hair and Scalp Clinic, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. Andrew Kaufman, MD, assistant professor, department of dermatology, University of California, Los Angeles; medical director, Center for Dermatology Care, Thousand Oaks, Calif. Tom Barrows, PhD, director of product development, Aderans Research Institute Inc., Atlanta. Cotsarelis, G. and Millar, S.E. Trends in Molecular Medicine, July 2001; vol 7: pp 293-301. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery web site. American Academy of Facial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery web site. American Hair Loss Council web site. Springer, K. American Family Physician, July 1, 2003; vol 68: pp 93-102. Hair Loss Help web site, "Interview with Dr. Ken Washenik from Bosley." Fuchs, E. Developmental Cell, July 2001: vol 1: pp 13-25.
hey am 22.. i used alot of hair dyes and relaxers on my hair when i was younger like two years ago that’s when i started going bald. i decided to cut every hair on my head , now am very shy to walk around bald so i wore a cap or hat on my head everyday even in hot weather. the shape of my head is very bad i feel frustrated like am really young for all this. i started using rogaine early this December but am not seeing any improvement or whatever is because i always cover my head with a cap or what? please i need an advice on what to do cos i don’t think i can go anywhere without covering my ugly head.
Every woman desires thick, long, and lustrous hair. From teenagers to oldies, everyone loves their hair because of the pivotal role it plays in defining one’s face and looks. Luscious hair that has enough shine, length, and strength is what everyone tries to achieve. Unfortunately, hair fall, hair loss, and impaired hair growth are common hair issues that people face. Hectic lifestyles, pollution, and adulterated hair care products are to blame. If you want an effective, safe, and easy solution for your hair growth problems, this article can help you.
For those concerned that the existing treatments lack a certain sci-fi quality, behold the Laser Comb. The Laser Comb recently became only the third hair loss treatment to receive FDA approval. And it is the first that doesn’t use drugs or surgery. By stimulating follicles with a low-level laser, the hand-held device was shown in test trials to increase hair volume in a majority of patients.
Studies show that Propecia is effective for 86 percent of men who use it, but doctors interviewed by USA Today say that "anyone who expects miracles will be disappointed." They explain: Only about one-third of men in the early stages of hair loss will regrow some with Propecia. These doctors say that it "primarily slow(s) down hair loss and improve(s) hair quality." As reported at HairLossHelp.com, a five-year study published in 2001 found that Propecia continued to prevent hair loss but there was a "progressive decrease in the amount of hair grown over the five-year period." Experts say that it is effective at growing back more hair than minoxidil (Rogaine) but that it can take up to a year to see results.
Not surprisingly, treatments with 5 percent minoxidil work better than treatments with 2 percent minoxidil. A randomized clinical trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2002 found that, in men with androgenetic alopecia, “5 percent topical minoxidil was clearly superior to 2 percent topical minoxidil and placebo in increasing hair growth.” The difference was actually pretty astounding — after 48 weeks, the men who used 5 percent minoxidil experienced 45 percent more hair growth than the men who used the 2 percent treatment.
×