Massaging the scalp can help to restore hair growth and can be used in conjunction with hair oils and masks. This stimulates the scalp and can improve hair thickness. Taking the time to massage your scalp each day can also help you relieve stress and tension. It’s thought that stretching forces during the massage encourage hair growth and thickness in the dermal papilla cells.
Baking soda can remove the excess product and chlorine build-up from your scalp and hair (56). Such build-up usually clogs your pores and stunts hair growth. Massaging with this versatile powder can also exfoliate your scalp, get rid of the dead skin cells, and improve blood circulation to the scalp (57). As baking soda is antifungal, it will also treat any fungal infections that may be present (58).
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At the same time you supplement your diet with nutrients for hair growth and treat your scalp to stop hair loss, it’s a good idea to switch to a better shampoo and conditioner. For example, shampoos without sulfates are rapidly gaining in popularity. People now realize that sulfates strip essential oils from their scalp and leave their hair fragile and dry.
Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research confirmed that a 2% solution of minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. How it works is still not clear. Two double-blind studies of women ages 18 to 45 demonstrated its effectiveness. In one study, 13% of female minoxidil users had moderate hair growth, and 50%, minimal growth (compared with 6% and 33%, respectively, in the placebo group). In the second study, 60% of women in the minoxidil group reported new hair growth, compared with 40% in the placebo group. As a result of these studies and others, over-the-counter 2% minoxidil is FDA-approved for treating androgenetic alopecia in women.
One hard truth: Hair loss is mostly out of your control. “Baldness comes down to your genes,” says Frederick Joyce, M.D., founder of Rejuvenate! Med Spa and a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery. “If you have the baldness gene, there are some natural remedies that may make your hair stronger and healthier to slow your hair loss slightly—but they won’t prevent you from going bald. Still, maintaining hair health by eating well and using the right products—combined with medical-grade treatments—can really work all together to help you have a fuller, thicker head of hair.”
If you can handle the smell of onion juice, you may find that the benefits are worth it. Onion juice has been shown to successfully treat patchy alopecia areata by promoting hair growth. Onion juice is also thought to improve circulation. Animal studies show improved keratin growth factor and blood flow to the cuticles. You can blend a few onions and squeeze out the juice. Apply the juice to your scalp and hair and leave in for at least 15 minutes. Then shampoo normally.
It's for this reason that people can be quick to try any remedy that promises results. And we get it; those before-and-after photos will really get to you. The technology behind hair growth and anti-loss treatments has improved in recent years, too, though it's worth noting that some of these treatments can be expensive and unsustainable. Because not everyone can afford to drop 80 bucks on a bottle of growth supplements (or hundos on an in-office treatment), many people turn to natural and DIY alternatives.
Finally, if these tests come back normal, your dermatologist may suggest a scalp biopsy of a couple of two-millimeter sections taken from your scalp under local anesthesia ($400 and up). It can determine whether genetic hair loss, telogen effluvium (a condition in which hair falls out from stress or rapid weight gain), or a disease (such as lupus) is the cause of your shedding, and your dermatologist can treat you accordingly.
A clinician diagnoses female pattern hair loss by taking a medical history and examining the scalp. She or he will observe the pattern of hair loss, check for signs of inflammation or infection, and possibly order blood tests to investigate other possible causes of hair loss, including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and iron deficiency. Unless there are signs of excess androgen activity (such as menstrual irregularities, acne, and unwanted hair growth), a hormonal evaluation is usually unnecessary.

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There are several different types of medication you can buy to help treat hair loss. Procepia and Finasteride are currently the only approved drugs you can take that will effectively treat hair loss. The active ingredient in both treatments (finasteride) works by blocking DHT (the male hormone dihydrotestosterone) that causes hair loss by shrinking hair follicles on your scalp. It has been proven to lead to hair regrowth or to stop hair loss in around 9 out of 10 men in clinical trials. 
Some doctors prescribe Avodart off-label (meaning to treat something other than illnesses or conditions listed on the drug's label) to patients suffering from male-pattern baldness. Dutasteride, the active ingredient in Avodart, like finasteride, is used to treat enlarged prostate glands, but it blocks both types of the enzyme that create DHT, instead of just one. Studies show that dutasteride is superior to finasteride in treating AGA, but it has yet to be approved by the FDA for that purpose.
And though this treatment appears to be safe and somewhat effective, it’s hard to tell who will react well to this low-level light therapy, which is why the doctors I spoke with were hesitant to fully endorse it. “We’re not sure what the optimal power is, what the optimal wavelength is, we don’t even really know the mechanism of action of how this is working,” says Rieder. Plus, it doesn’t work on everyone. “There are subpopulations of patients who do respond to low-level laser light, but this is not easily predictable,” explains McMichael, though she adds that the risk of using the LaserComb is low.
The most unique ingredient in this tablet formulation is solubilized keratin. It is a breakthrough supplement proven to help reduce hair loss and promote regrowth. The tablets also contains a blend of 23 essential vitamins essential for micro-circulation of blood within the roots of the hair. The product is suitable for both men and women and has been shown to effectively combat the balding.
As with transplants, the word toupee conjures an outdated and disagreeable image. The 70s-style rugs have mostly been traded in for spiffier "hair replacement systems." But the basic concept -- a foreign object atop your head -- can only evolve so far. Of course, the effectiveness of hairpieces is tough to evaluate. You may spot an awful one now and then, but the ones you do spot are just the awful ones. Who knows how many masterpieces slip undetected under the radar? 

There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
If you think over-the-counter hair loss shampoos are for you or just want to promote growth and strength, Dr. Schwieger recommends formulas with antioxidants such as vitamin E and ginseng, amino acids, and B-vitamins to help rebuild hair and reduce environmental damage. She cautions against those with parabens, sulfates, and fragrances, which can irritate hair and reduce moisture. Ahead, eight vetted hair loss shampoos to try.
Anti-androgens. Androgen receptor–blocking drugs such as spironolactone (Aldactone) and finasteride (Propecia) are not approved for the treatment of female pattern hair loss, and there is little reliable evidence that they are effective. However, some case studies suggest that women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of spironolactone. In the relatively uncommon cases where there is an excess of androgen, a clinician may prescribe 100 to 200 milligrams of an androgen receptor–blocking drug daily, together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
3. Hair fibers. The best (and easiest) way to hide a widening part or sparse patch is with hair fibers. They’re tiny, charged fibers that adhere to your scalp (until your next shampoo). Toppik Hair Building Fibers ($25) come in a range of colors so you can easily find one that matches your own hair. (In a pinch, you can also brush a powdered eye shadow that matches your hair color along your part.)
I’m 33 years old. I’ve been using Finasteride (1mg) for over 3+ years now, and it really stopped my hair loss. I say I’m a living proof of the effectiveness of this drug. And yes it really lowered my libido. But then in these past days, I felt this pain around my testicles. Then my leg became partly numb. I tried to experiment on how to stop the pain and numbness by stopping Finasteride for a while. Sequentially, the pain and the numbness went away after stopping it. I’m afraid of coming back on drinking Finasteride again.
A unique formulation by Ultrax is the Hair Lush. Formulated in a serum form containing caffeine, immediately adds volume to hair. It also contains a proprietary blend of ingredients which are known to promote hair growth and prevent hair loss. The leave in caffeine formulations are known to improve the health of hair and Hair lush performs up to expectations.
This article is COMPREHENSIVE and sticks to the tried and tested (read scientifically proven) treatment methods. For me, if you’re suffering from pattern baldness, then the best chance you have is the Big Three. That said, it is worth potentially trying other, more natural, treatments if your hair loss isn’t aggressive and if you have an aversion to medicated products. I’m not talking about snake oil here. There are some treatments out there that, while not a primary treatment mode, can help to at least arrest hair loss in milder cases. As always with hair loss it’s a question of probabilities. I don’t think I’ve come across a product that works 100% of the time for 100% of the people. But the best chance undoubtedly comes with the FDA approved products to date. Also loved the future pipeline chart. Fantastic view of what will (hopefully) be more effective treatments in the future.
Hair loss can be devastating for both men and women, even more so when there are loads of products on the market that don't work. According to the American Hair Loss Association (AHLA), two thirds of American men experience some degree of hair loss by the age of 35. By the age of 50, approximately 85 percent experience significantly thinning hair. Balding is commonly associated with aging, but for 25 percent of men the process begins before the age of 21. What's more, hair loss is not limited to men: The American Hair Loss Association reports that women make up about 40 percent of hair-loss sufferers in the United States.

In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.

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