The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
This hair regrowth product is a one of a kind organic shampoo formulated with plant stem cells. The rare stem cells from Switzerland help to combat hair loss in an innovative and effective new way by encouraging cells that regrow to be stronger than ever. This shampoo has a mild formula which is gentle on the scalp, making it a perfect option for men who want to steer clear of topical chemical treatments while getting the same results.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).
Physicians are reluctant to prescribe systemic treatments (pills or other form of treatment that affects your entire system) because they can tamper with your body's own androgen levels (see Causes for an explanation of androgens). The doctor will first want to confirm that the hair loss is due to an excess of androgen (another name for male hormones) in the system or a sensitized "over-response" to normal amounts of androgen. Therefore, physicians often choose topical treatments, which are applied directly to the scalp.
The most common kind of hair loss is pattern baldness. It happens when hair follicles shrink and stop working. The first sign is the appearance of strands that are thinner and more fragile. Then the scalp becomes more visible as fewer hairs grow to replace those that shed. That’s because the anagen phase becomes too short for the hair to grow out of the scalp. Plus, the hairs that remain aren’t securely anchored. And this condition happens to both men and women.

Excessive hair loss led me to this product about six years ago, and having sought advice from physicians ("It's stress"), a vitamin guru ($150 later) and all the information I could glean from the internet, I was wisely advised by my dermatologist to try men's Rogaine. The price, however, was a major deterrent, so more sleuthing led me to Walmart, and their version of Rogaine -- just plain minoxidil, but at an affordable price. Equate did wonders! And has continued to work its volumizing wonders over the years. My hair's thick and shiny, and while it undergoes spells of temporary loss, it always returns in full volume. I couldn't live without this product -- and a three-months' supply for a little more than $18 (5% solution), it's not only a bargain, but a blessing!!
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
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