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Great article thx!! I’m 38 and still have a full head of hair but I started to shed about 3 months ago. Typically ~15 hairs on my pillow when I wake up and 20 or so hairs on my hand after I shower. I also notice hairs on my desk during the day. I never noticed any hair loss before 3 months ago. I started to use rogaine 5% twice a day about a month and a half ago and the shedding accelerated. I read that is normal but should it still be doing this after 1.5 months? I haven’t tried propecia yet as I want to see if Rogaine will do the trick but will if the shedding doesn’t stop. Also, do you think stress can play a part in hair loss? I started a super stressful job about 6 months ago so thinking my hair loss could be related to that.
While diet alone won’t save your hair, there may be some truth to the old adage that you are what you eat. “You’re not going to have the healthiest hair if you’re living off doughnuts, because being nutrient-deficient weakens strands and makes them more prone to breakage,” says Denise Kernan, owner of DK Hair Techs, Inc., a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery, and a hair transplant technician who has worked on everyone from senators to sports stars to actors to mafia guys (she won’t name names to protect the privacy of her clients).
These anti-androgenic effects can be used to help treat hair loss. Nizoral shampoo contains 2% ketoconazole and is prescribed not only for the treatment of scalp conditions, but also in combination with other treatments for androgenetic alopecia. A 1% version is now available over-the-counter, but it may not be as effective as the 2% prescription strength. There are no significant side effects.
Warnings For external use only Flammable: Keep away from fire or flame Do not use if your degree of hair loss is different than that shown on the side of this carton, because this product may not work for you you have no family history of hair loss your hair loss is sudden and/or patchy your hair loss is associated with childbirth you do not know the reason for your hair loss you are under 18 years of age. Do not use on babies and children. your scalp is red, inflamed, infected, irritated, or painful. you use other medicines on the scalp. 

Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.

You can also get a hair-loss kit from Hims, which comes with both minoxidil and finasteride. Keeps has one, as well. And though it might seem like overkill to take two different hair-loss treatments at once, this is one of those rare instances where more is actually better. McAndrews calls the combination of orally administered finasteride and topically applied minoxidil a “full-court press” against hair loss. “That’s doing the most you can for preventative medicine.” Rieder notes that taking both drugs together is more effective than taking either one alone. 

Other medical conditions — most commonly telogen effluvium and seborrheic dermatitis — can also cause hair loss, but most people can trace their follicular woes back to androgenetic alopecia, so we focused our search there. We started with more than 200 products, including all-natural solutions and high-tech gadgets, while skipping treatments that focus only on volumizing or thickening hair. We also limited our scope to the scalp, and left out specialty products designed only for eyebrows or beards.
I have been on Proscar now (1.25mg/day) for nearly 10 months, rogaine foam 1 to 2 days a time and Nizoral shampoo a few times a week. unfortunately, the shedding never stopped. When I shower, I still see 10-15 hairs on my hand when I shampoo and another 5-10 after I comb my hair after I shower . . . and then another 10-15 when I style my hair with gel in the mornings. I’m going to switch to name brand Propecia and try that out for a few months but I think I may just not responding to this treatment. My hair is absolutely more thin than it was before I started treatment. My thinking is that I go another 3 months on name brand propecia and if that doesn’t work, try Avordart. Thoughts?

Like minoxidil, finasteride, the active ingredient in Propecia, was originally created with a different purpose in mind -- to treat enlarged prostate glands -- and researchers observed it came with a side effect of hair growth. Unlike topical minoxidil, finasteride requires a prescription, is taken orally and addresses hormonal causes of hair loss. It inhibits the enzyme type II 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into DHT. As it was the first truly effective treatment for hair loss that provided nearly guaranteed results, finasteride revolutionized the hair-loss-treatment industry.
Both minoxidil and finasteride require a lifelong commitment, but for users looking for a treatment with permanent results, hair transplant surgery may be the solution. Over the years, surgeons have developed techniques to deliver natural-looking results that are a far cry from early hair transplants, which had a cornrow-like appearance. These procedures are costly and may require multiple sessions depending on the patient.
As with any new technology, there is still a lot of educating that needs to happen, at both the physician and consumer level, when talking about robotic hair transplants. Some people have the misconception that the ARTAS robot is operating on it own when, in reality, the robot is simply an extension of the operator, working within parameters programmed by the surgeon. Its effectiveness, therefore, is tied directly to the expertise of the surgeon and the end result — as with any hair transplant — is only as natural as the artistic skills of the surgeon behind the machine.
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
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