The most common side effects are itching and other skin irritations of the treated area of the scalp. Minoxidil topical solution 2% contains alcohol, which would cause burning or irritation of the eyes or sensitive skin areas. If minoxidil topical solution 2% accidentally gets into these areas, rinse with large amounts of cool tap water. Contact your doctor if irritation persists.
Why? Unwanted hair growth (sideburns, for example) is a reported side effect of minoxidil. The belief is that a higher concentration of minoxidil would result in more unwanted hair, which is why women are instructed to use it less often. However, the study in Skin Therapy Letter reports that unwanted hair was more common in 2 percent minoxidil solutions than 5 percent, and women are instructed to use Rogaine’s 2 percent solution twice daily — so what gives?

During the trials on men with prostate problems, researchers noted an intriguing side effect: hair growth. Since finasteride had already been approved by the FDA to treat enlarged prostates in men, Merck decided to pursue the possibility of developing finasteride as the first pill to treat male pattern baldness. Minoxidil, a topical liquid solution, was already on the market (see below).


Utilize caution when utilizing a compost tumbler, however, because hair does not appear to compost completely in them. Hair exists in a number of textures. Cutting the hair also might be an indication of mourning. Human hair is among those important things that form the idea of beauty. Human facial hair grows faster than every other hair physically.

The use of PRP “enhancements” such as Extracellular Matrix (ECMs) as well as Stem Cells/Signaling Cells can be added to the PRP to enhance it’s hair growth properties and prolong its effects. When PRP is performed without these enhancements, multiple repeat treatments are needed as often as every other month. Research has shown that the use of ECMs like ACell–derived from porcine/pig bladder, BioD–derived from donated healthy human placenta, Adipose-Derived Stem/Signalling Cells–harvested and separated from the patient’s own fat, and even special exosome preparations can help strengthen the effectiveness and lengthen the duration of the results from a single PRP treatment.  

That’s why I created this guide. I want to help steer you in the right direction. There are many new treatments and possibly even cures on the horizon, but for now, stick to what is proven to work. After all, the best way to treat hair loss is to start managing it early on. It’s much easier to keep your remaining hair compared to growing it back. And worst case scenario, you will slow it down to a degree it may take several years to show any further recession.
2. Pyrithione zinc shampoo. Traditional volumizing shampoos will give the hair you have a lift so it looks fuller (we like the sulfate-free L’Oréal Paris EverPure Volume Shampoo, $8). But some research suggests shampoos with the antidandruff ingredient zinc pyrithione can mitigate hair loss that’s caused by conditions like dandruff, says Mirmirani. Try Head & Shoulders Deep Moisture Shampoo ($6), and use a conditioner without silicones — they can make hair appear limper, especially if it's applied near the roots (we like Love Beauty and Planet Coconut Water & Mimosa Flower Conditioner, $9).
There are several different types of medication you can buy to help treat hair loss. Procepia and Finasteride are currently the only approved drugs you can take that will effectively treat hair loss. The active ingredient in both treatments (finasteride) works by blocking DHT (the male hormone dihydrotestosterone) that causes hair loss by shrinking hair follicles on your scalp. It has been proven to lead to hair regrowth or to stop hair loss in around 9 out of 10 men in clinical trials. 

Topical treatments like Rogaine use the active ingredient minoxidil -- originally used to treat high blood pressure. After researchers discovered that it also promoted hair growth, it was the first drug approved by the FDA to treat male pattern baldness. It is used topically on the scalp, and the success of treatment is dependent on the user's extent of hair loss. Researchers at the AHLA find its efficacy to be marginal in the long run since it has no effect on the hormonal process. 
“There’s people selling pills and creams and lotions and whatever else, and sometimes you can’t even trust what ingredients they have in there,” he warned us when we spoke to him over the phone. Key takeaway: The hair loss industry is crazy dishonest, so we eliminated any treatments (especially homeopathic methods) that aren’t based in concrete, peer-reviewed science.
While biotin is a type of vitamin that plays a functional role in hair growth, there are other vitamins that can help improve the overall health of your hair. Vitamin E is one such key vitamin that acts as an antioxidant and helps to reduce the oxidative stress on your scalp. This greatly affects hair growth, and this was proven by a study published in the Tropical Life Sciences Research journal (2). Another vitamin that is useful is vitamin C. It removes the dead cells build-up from the scalp and unclogs the hair follicles. This can improve hair growth as well (3). Vitamin C tablets can be added to a carrier oil and used to massage the scalp. Internal supplements of both these vitamins also help.

1. Minoxidil. It’s the only FDA-approved topical nonprescription medication that can claim to regrow hair — and it should be part of any hair-loss plan if you have serious thinning, says Rogers. Minoxidil has loads of research to back it, but it requires commitment. If you quit using it, your hair will start to lose ground again. Use a 5 percent strength, like Women’s Rogaine 5% Minoxidil Foam ($30), once daily to see results in three to four months, says Rogers.

There are many potential causes of hair loss, including medical conditions, medications, and physical or emotional stress. If you notice unusual hair loss of any kind, it's important to see your primary care provider or a dermatologist, to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. You may also want to ask your clinician for a referral to a therapist or support group to address emotional difficulties. Hair loss can be frustrating, but recent years have seen an increase in resources for coping with the problem.


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This procedure can take several hours. First, surgeons remove an elliptical strip 3 to 4 inches long from the back of the scalp and trim the hairs short (A). The strip is then divided into 500 to 2,000 separate follicular units, each containing only a few hairs (). The units are then planted in an equivalent number of slits made in the scalp in the area of missing hair (C).
Laser devices: Brushes, combs, and other hand-held devices that emit laser light might stimulate hair growth. These devices might make hair look more youthful in some people. Because the FDA classifies these products as medical devices, the products do not undergo the rigorous testing that medicines undergo. The long-term effectiveness and safety for these devices are not known.
The truth is, the amount of propylene glycol in hair loss treatments is not likely to cause any real harm and the FDA has given the chemical approval for many uses. But even though it is safe, we wanted to ensure that our top picks would be as comfortable to use as possible. So when Dr. Khadavi told us that “a third of my patients get irritated from minoxidil products because of propylene glycol,” we decided to cut any treatments with it. In any case, it’s the minoxidil that helps curb hair loss and not the propylene glycol.
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Reality is, if finasterise is so safe, why doesn’t merk market this drug as a vaccine for hair loss? For every man north of 18 to take this drug to prevent the possibility of balding? It’s safe, so why not? Truth is the science isn’t clear that either AR inhibition or DHT reduction is safe. All we know is that merk did a study and were able to publish data that suits their agenda.
The main type of hair loss in both sexes — and the subject of this article — is androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Instead, you may want to add vitamin D (about $15) to your shopping cart. A vitamin D deficiency can exacerbate hair thinning and make it almost impossible for any over-the-counter product to reverse hair loss, says Dhaval Bhanusali, a dermatologist in New York City, who recommends taking 5,000 international units of D3 a day (and it’s generally beneficial for bone health in women over 40). “There’s also a link between low iron and zinc levels and temporary hair shedding, called [telogen] effluvium,” says Rogers.

While biotin is a type of vitamin that plays a functional role in hair growth, there are other vitamins that can help improve the overall health of your hair. Vitamin E is one such key vitamin that acts as an antioxidant and helps to reduce the oxidative stress on your scalp. This greatly affects hair growth, and this was proven by a study published in the Tropical Life Sciences Research journal (2). Another vitamin that is useful is vitamin C. It removes the dead cells build-up from the scalp and unclogs the hair follicles. This can improve hair growth as well (3). Vitamin C tablets can be added to a carrier oil and used to massage the scalp. Internal supplements of both these vitamins also help.

I agree everyone should at least try Finasteride to see if they experience side effects, personally I tried it and it gave me side effects even taking 1/4th of a pill, I also tried avodart and wow that REALLY gave me side effects, it gave me retrograde ejaculation, some ppl are just sensitive to androgen suppressors, if you are then your best bet is to stay away from anything that suppresses your androgens, your hair loss may suffer from this though. Currently I’m on lipogaine and Nizoral, I throw in Emu Oil too, I’m going to give the dermaroller a chance. You can still fight hairloss without Finasteride, give it a chance if you experience sides come off of it immediately, weigh the pros and cons, obviously my sex life is more important than hair so I chose to come off of it, but not everyone will experience side effects like I did.


Not surprisingly, treatments with 5 percent minoxidil work better than treatments with 2 percent minoxidil. A randomized clinical trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2002 found that, in men with androgenetic alopecia, “5 percent topical minoxidil was clearly superior to 2 percent topical minoxidil and placebo in increasing hair growth.” The difference was actually pretty astounding — after 48 weeks, the men who used 5 percent minoxidil experienced 45 percent more hair growth than the men who used the 2 percent treatment.
Why? Unwanted hair growth (sideburns, for example) is a reported side effect of minoxidil. The belief is that a higher concentration of minoxidil would result in more unwanted hair, which is why women are instructed to use it less often. However, the study in Skin Therapy Letter reports that unwanted hair was more common in 2 percent minoxidil solutions than 5 percent, and women are instructed to use Rogaine’s 2 percent solution twice daily — so what gives?
If you do decide to start treatment to save your hair, a good place to start is with minoxidil, more commonly known as Rogaine. Don’t expect this hair-loss treatment to create luscious locks; minoxidil is better at slowing down or preventing more loss rather than promoting hair growth. But, according to Dr. Amy McMichael, professor and chair of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Department of Dermatology, it is effective “if used as recommended, with evidence of improvement seen around six to nine months.” Simply massage the foam or solution into your scalp once or twice daily, and for best results, use a formula with 5 percent concentration.
That meant new products like Hims and Keeps were out.Hims and Keeps are relatively new companies that allow you to set up a subscription for hair loss treatments. Both offer finasteride (after an online consultation with a doctor) or 5 percent minoxidil. However, their minoxidil solutions contain propylene glycol, so we cut them from consideration.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).
Laser treatments are the latest frontier in staving off hair loss, and they’ll be the first choice for fans of sci-fi. As silly as they may sound, these treatments do work — the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2014 reported a “statistically significant difference” in hair density with no “serious adverse events” or side effects.The bad news: Laser treatments tend to be expensive, progress is slow, and they don’t always produce stellar results.
Women with androgenic alopecia may consider trying prescription ketoconazole at a strength of 2 percent. This drug comes in the form of a shampoo and also goes by the name Nizoral. It’s an antifungal agent and may help reduce the body’s production of testosterone and other androgens that lead to hair loss. You can also find 1 percent strength at your local pharmacy, but it may not be as effective.
I started using rogaine about 2 years ago. It seems to work better on the top of my head than it does on my hairline. The thing I don’t like about rogaine is it makes my scalp very itchy and flaky. Do you think I would have anything to lose by switching to the lipogaine? And what products other than propecia would you roccomend I add to my regimine. Thanks man. Great article btw
Men's Rogaine Extra Strength Hair Regrowth Treatment (5 percent minoxidil) boasts impressive hair growth rates, slowing hair loss for the vast majority of men who use it diligently. The hair-loss treatment is available over the counter and leads to only minimal side effects, all of which go away when treatment is discontinued. See our full review »
Rosemary is one of the first essential oils people choose to promote hair growth and reduce hair loss. Rosemary oil stimulates new hair growth and can be used to treat androgenetic alopecia. Mix a few drops of rosemary oil into a carrier oil and massage it into your hair and scalp before rinsing. Do this a few times per week. Add a few drops of rosemary oil into your shampoo and conditioner on a daily basis. Do not use essential oils directly on the skin. Always mix them in a carrier oil or shampoo.
Getting Rapunzel-like strands is no easy feat—ask any girl who’s gobbled down countless biotin pills and vitamin E supplements only to be greeted with the same lackluster strands. There are a lot of factors that contribute to hair growth (or lack thereof), but one of the most overlooked is physical stimulation—as in, massaging the heck out of your scalp. Turns out giving yourself a scalp massage using some key natural ingredients can help your hair grow faster and in turn make your strands look more Blake Lively–esque. Or there’s the whole egg-yolk-mask thing. Or why not try a hot oil castor oil treatment? There are plenty of natural treatments that will give you the hair of your dreams—all you have to do is look to your kitchen for the necessary supplies.
However, ketoconazole is still not FDA approved for hair loss treatment, which means it cannot be endorsed or marketed as such. Put simply, ketoconazole likely curbs hair loss, but additional research is needed for the FDA to give it approval. While it is safe to use as a supplement to our top picks, we wanted to recommend products with as much scientific backing as possible. So, we stuck with FDA approved minoxidil or FDA cleared laser treatments. But we’ll keep a close eye on products like ketoconazole shampoos and update as new research appears.
Part your hair in the area of hair thinning/loss. Follow the instructions below for using the dropper applicator and apply one mL 2 times a day directly onto the scalp in the hair loss area. Do not use more. Spread the liquid evenly over the hair loss area. If you use your fingers, wash hands with soap and water immediately. Each bottle should last about one month, if used as directed. Use a mild shampoo if you wash your scalp before applying minoxidil topical solution 2%.
Egg is rich in proteins, sulfur, zinc, iron, selenium, phosphorus, and iodine. The high protein content makes eggs one of the best ingredients that promote hair growth. The natural fats present in eggs moisturize and nourish the hair follicles and hair strands. The vitamins A, E, and D reduce hair fall, improve hair texture, and give your hair a lustrous shine (29).
Eventually, these follicles close completely and stop producing any new hair at all. In other instances, men will start to notice hair loss because of lifestyle and environmental factors. For example, being overly stressed for extended periods of time can cause for a man’s hair to start falling out in clumps. And if a man isn’t getting proper vitamins and nutrients to nourish his hair, the strands could possibly grow increasingly weaker until they start breaking off and thinning out. Luckily, there are many hair growth products for men on the market today which can help men in these situations to grow their hair back.
Other options include microneedling ($1,200 and up per treatment) and platelet-replacement therapy (also $1,200 and up per treatment), which are usually offered in conjunction. Your scalp will be numbed first so you don’t feel the pinpricks involved in microneedling. They promote hair regeneration by spurring wound healing, and platelet-replacement therapy involves injecting growth factors into those wounds. “Combination therapy typically works better than monotherapy and usually yields results after three monthly treatments,” says Sadick, and should be teamed with an at-home minoxidil treatment.

A little farther up the follicle is the mysterious feature called the bulge. That's where follicle stem cells live. When they get the right set of chemical signals, these self-renewing cells divide. They don't divide like normal cells, in which both halves become new cells that keep splitting and developing. Only one half of the follicle stem cell does that. The other half becomes a new stem cell, and stays put for future regeneration.


The truth is, the amount of propylene glycol in hair loss treatments is not likely to cause any real harm and the FDA has given the chemical approval for many uses. But even though it is safe, we wanted to ensure that our top picks would be as comfortable to use as possible. So when Dr. Khadavi told us that “a third of my patients get irritated from minoxidil products because of propylene glycol,” we decided to cut any treatments with it. In any case, it’s the minoxidil that helps curb hair loss and not the propylene glycol.
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