PRP for Hair Growth has become one of the most exciting recent breakthroughs in hair restoration, and is not only showing positive results as a stand-alone treatment, it has proved to be a valuable tool during hair transplantation as well. During the transplant process, PRP has been shown to strengthen non-transplanted hair, minimize donor scarring and accelerate wound healing. In addition, PRP has also been reported to improve graft survival and accelerate the growth of the transplanted hair.
NuNutrients Advanced is a potent serum that works at the root of hair loss. It revitalizes hair follicles, helps reduce hair loss, and reduces inflammation, while regrowing hair by reducing the level of DHT (which can degrade hair follicles and inflame the skin). Voted a #1 trusted brand in 2013 and 2014, this effective treatment uses Biochanin A (extracted from Red Clover) to produce results that can’t be achieved with other products. Biochanin A is a natural inhibitor of DHT, subdues hair loss, and modulates free radical damage to the skin and scalp. This helps the hair stay rooted much longer, while increasing the size of the hair follicle for better volume. It also uses Acetyl Tetrapeptide-3 Biomimetic peptides to stimulate the extracellular matrix proteins for stronger hair anchoring. It also prevents hair from falling out and improves the scalp’s health, while adding more volume and increasing the size of the hair follicle.
Alopecia areata: Researchers believe that this is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune means the body attacks itself. In this case, the body attacks its own hair. This causes smooth, round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body. People with alopecia areata are often in excellent health. Most people see their hair re-grow. Dermatologists treat people with this disorder to help the hair re-grow more quickly.
The general medical consensus around laser treatments — caps and combs alike — is that low-level laser light therapy stimulates the cells within the hair follicle. These devices may also increase cell metabolism to promote thicker and more durable hair shafts, something that neither minoxidil or finasteride can do. To use the HairMax Ultima, all you have to do is glide the device over your scalp slowly. Treatments should take about eight minutes, and you should do it three days per week for the best results.
Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
The other main hair-loss treatment that was recommended by all four dermatologists I interviewed is finasteride, often called by its brand name Propecia. This FDA-approved medication is only available with a prescription, but these days, it’s found as a generic and ordered online after a virtual consultation, through start-ups like Hims, Keeps, and Lemonaid.
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