The other main hair-loss treatment that was recommended by all four dermatologists I interviewed is finasteride, often called by its brand name Propecia. This FDA-approved medication is only available with a prescription, but these days, it’s found as a generic and ordered online after a virtual consultation, through start-ups like Hims, Keeps, and Lemonaid.
But in November, after 10 years of research, Rogaine introduced a new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women. It’s a mousse (instead of a liquid) that needs to be applied only once a day instead of twice, which means that it can be more easily incorporated into a woman’s evening skin-care routine. Teal replaces the blue and silver palette of the men’s Rogaine, and the packaging bears a lotus flower. (Also last year, Pantene introduced its Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, which is 2 percent minoxidil.)
Most women with pattern hair loss don't get a receding hairline or bald spot on top of the scalp as is common in men. Instead, there is visible thinning over the crown. In men and women, hairs are miniaturized because of a shortened growth cycle where the hair stays on the head for a shorter period of time. These wispy hairs, which resemble forearm hairs, do not achieve their usual length.

A commonly prescribed treatment for women is hormone replacement therapy (HRT). HRT is only prescribed to women with AGA during menopause or women who have low estrogen and/or progesterone for other reasons. These female hormones suppress male hormone production and seem to keep hair loss at bay. Physicians, however, do not recommend long periods of HRT treatment because of the increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke.


Minoxidil topical solution 2% will not prevent or improve hair loss related to pregnancy, the use of some prescription and non-prescription medications, certain severe nutritional problems (very low body iron; excessive vitamin A intake), the recently discontinued use of birth control pills, low thyroid states (hypothyroidism), chemotherapy, or diseases which cause scarring of the scalp. Also, minoxidil topical solution 2% will not improve hair loss due to:
PRP for Hair Growth has become one of the most exciting recent breakthroughs in hair restoration, and is not only showing positive results as a stand-alone treatment, it has proved to be a valuable tool during hair transplantation as well. During the transplant process, PRP has been shown to strengthen non-transplanted hair, minimize donor scarring and accelerate wound healing. In addition, PRP has also been reported to improve graft survival and accelerate the growth of the transplanted hair.
Skeptics (among them, Dr. Wesley) are starting to come around after a 2014 randomized double-blind study published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology found a “statistically significant” difference in hair density for women who used a laser comb compared with those who used a sham device. (“Comb” is something of a misnomer. The device looks like a hairbrush crossed with a cordless phone; it is glided back and forth across the scalp, roughly a half-inch at a time, usually about 15 minutes three times a week.)
The majority of American men and women are affected by hair loss, known as alopecia, at some point in their lives, according to experts. Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), commonly referred to as male- or female-pattern baldness, accounts for about 95 percent of hair loss in the U.S., according to Better Nutrition magazine. Experts say pattern baldness is genetic and inherited equally in men and women. However, the hair-loss gene can only express itself when dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a male hormone, is present. Because estrogen usually suppresses male-hormone production, women don't typically experience pattern baldness until after menopause has begun; although, even the slightest hormone shift can cause hair loss in women.

While minoxidil has been clinically proven to slow the progression of hair loss and regrow some hair, most experts see it as a relatively marginally effective drug in the fight against hair loss. Since minoxidil has no effect on the hormonal process of hair loss, its positive effects are at best temporary and usually yield somewhat disappointing results.
Procepia and Finasteride will only prevent hair loss and aid hair regrowth for the duration of your treatment. As soon as you stop taking them, any hair loss you would have had during that time will happen within a few months of ending the treatment. A doctor needs to check whether you can use either medication. You can order your treatment online from Superdrug and get your prescription from one of our online doctors, who will review your order.
I will write more later, but this morning, I confirmed that YES this is working. It's totally working. I have new growth all over the "test" area (I was afraid of the dread shed) where I was using it. It's been about 6 weeks. The growth is healthy--these are thick, normal hairs. I tried a bunch of natural stuff before this. I was freaking out, thinking there were wigs in my future. My hair is still falling out a lot, but to see regrowth is such an incredible relief. I just want to put this out there to everyone who is struggling with hair loss, for whatever reason--i don't care what the studies say--this is abundant regrowth. And it's definitely from the romaine. Not crazy about putting chemicals on my head every day, but the stress and worry about my hair was almost definitely more toxic than whatever is in this. No side effects that I've noticed.
To us, that meant any product with zero proven ingredients, case studies, or FDA clearance — which shrunk our list by a whopping 180 contenders. That’s right, there are only three treatments that have actually been cleared by the FDA and supported with clinical studies: finasteride (commonly marketed as Propecia), minoxidil, and laser treatments. And, since finasteride is prescription-only, it left us with two.
The truth is, the amount of propylene glycol in hair loss treatments is not likely to cause any real harm and the FDA has given the chemical approval for many uses. But even though it is safe, we wanted to ensure that our top picks would be as comfortable to use as possible. So when Dr. Khadavi told us that “a third of my patients get irritated from minoxidil products because of propylene glycol,” we decided to cut any treatments with it. In any case, it’s the minoxidil that helps curb hair loss and not the propylene glycol.
Did you know the average woman is born with about 100,000 hair follicles on her head--and she keeps them for the rest of her life? Most women lose between 50 and 100 hairs a day. If your hair is healthy, it will grow back on its own. But if you're one of the 30 million women in America who experience hereditary hair loss, you may be losing 150 hairs or more a day--hair that doesn't grow back as thick and healthy as it once was.

The American Hair Loss Association still recommends the drug for those who have not responded favorably to finasteride treatment or for those who would like to add another product to their regimen. The AHLA does not recommend minoxidil as the first line of attack for men suffering with male pattern baldness, but does recognize it as an effective treatment for a small percentage of its users.
"Others are taking hair follicles out of human scalp and growing them with dermal papilla cells," Cotsarelis says. "If they grow in culture, you might be able to recombine them with skin cells and form new follicles. This would let you expand the number of follicles you get for a hair transplant. This may not be that far off -- five to 10 years, maybe. There's very good evidence you will be able to do that."

You can also get a hair-loss kit from Hims, which comes with both minoxidil and finasteride. Keeps has one, as well. And though it might seem like overkill to take two different hair-loss treatments at once, this is one of those rare instances where more is actually better. McAndrews calls the combination of orally administered finasteride and topically applied minoxidil a “full-court press” against hair loss. “That’s doing the most you can for preventative medicine.” Rieder notes that taking both drugs together is more effective than taking either one alone.
Sure, you can easily pop a hair growth supplement, but honestly, the word's still out on whether or not they're an effective way to help your hair grow faster. Plus, they can contain unnecessary large amounts of minerals and vitamins (ahem, biotin) which can actually wreak havoc in other ways (ahem, breakouts). Thus, eating your way to longer hair is actually a smarter, nutritionist-approved way to make your hair grow faster. Vitamins and minerals occurring naturally in foods are easier for your body to utilize, and they'll naturally deliver a healthier ratio of nutrients—just the way Mother Nature intended. 

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Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research confirmed that a 2% solution of minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. How it works is still not clear. Two double-blind studies of women ages 18 to 45 demonstrated its effectiveness. In one study, 13% of female minoxidil users had moderate hair growth, and 50%, minimal growth (compared with 6% and 33%, respectively, in the placebo group). In the second study, 60% of women in the minoxidil group reported new hair growth, compared with 40% in the placebo group. As a result of these studies and others, over-the-counter 2% minoxidil is FDA-approved for treating androgenetic alopecia in women.
Just letting go is possibly the most challenging of the available options. It’s also the cheapest and ultimately the most effective in the struggle with hair loss. Given the imperfections of surgical, medical, and technological options, there are many who advocate simple acceptance. (BaldRUs.com is one of several sites devoted to embracing the scalp's natural fate.) What's more, the health benefits of happier mirror time -- and fewer years of harmful anxiety -- just might offset the loss of those Samson-like powers.
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