Laser devices: Brushes, combs, and other hand-held devices that emit laser light might stimulate hair growth. These devices might make hair look more youthful in some people. Because the FDA classifies these products as medical devices, the products do not undergo the rigorous testing that medicines undergo. The long-term effectiveness and safety for these devices are not known.
I'll start by saying I actually don't have a serious hair loss problem. However, I have always had calics along my hairline, so I wanted to fill them in a little before my sister's wedding. I started using this product about a month ago. I hate that it never seems to dry, so I ended up throwing my hair in a slick bun to hide the sticky look on a number of occasions. But just last week a coworker pointed out that my hairline was filling in, which is when I finally realized that it was working! The wedding is over, but I plan on using it over the course of the next three months to see if I can obtain more permanent results. So far I'm pleased, but the results take time and it's a little pricier than I would like to admit. The twice a day thing is kind of a pain in the arse.

Although unwanted hair growth has been reported on the face and on other parts of the body, such reports have been infrequent. The unwanted hair growth may be caused by the transfer of minoxidil topical solution 2% to areas other than the scalp, or by absorption into the circulatory system of low levels of the active ingredient, or by a medical condition not related to the use of minoxidil topical solution 2%.
Results can take awhile to become apparent, so it’s important to be patient and follow the regimen exactly. It is best to begin using these products at the first signs of balding or hair thinning for the best results. Drinking more water, eating a balanced diet, taking a daily multivitamin, and taking advantage of additional supplements like Biotin can also help speed up hair regrowth.
Side effects and concerns: Around the time new hair growth starts, some women experience folliculitis (inflammation of the follicle). This minor complication can be treated with compresses and antibiotics. A more serious hazard is shock loss, the sudden loss of hair that normally grows in the area of the transplant. Shock loss affects 30% to 50% of female hair-transplant recipients; fortunately, the loss is usually temporary, and the hair will regrow. One drawback is that there's a finite amount of donor hair, and it may not be enough to fill in the transplant site as densely as before, especially if the area of thinning hair is large. A transplant procedure can cost from $4,000 to $15,000 and is rarely covered by insurance.
decrease in your blood Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) levels. Finasteride can affect a blood test called PSA (Prostate-Specific Antigen) for the screening of prostate cancer. If you have a PSA test done you should tell your healthcare provider that you are taking Finasteride because Finasteride decreases PSA levels. Changes in PSA levels will need to be evaluated by your healthcare provider. Any increase in follow-up PSA levels from their lowest point may signal the presence of prostate cancer and should be evaluated, even if the test results are still within the normal range for men not taking Finasteride. You should also tell your healthcare provider if you have not been taking Finasteride as prescribed because this may affect the PSA test results. For more information, talk to your healthcare provider.
Consuming omega fatty acids can help to improve your hair from the inside, since they are filled with nutrients and proteins. Taking an omega supplement along with antioxidants helps to improve hair density and diameter. It also reduces hair loss. Omega fatty acids help your cells to work correctly and can boost immunity, leading to better overall health. Follow the manufacturer’s recommended dosage.
This procedure can take several hours. First, surgeons remove an elliptical strip 3 to 4 inches long from the back of the scalp and trim the hairs short (A). The strip is then divided into 500 to 2,000 separate follicular units, each containing only a few hairs (). The units are then planted in an equivalent number of slits made in the scalp in the area of missing hair (C).
I’ve looked into taking finasteride. My father was prescribed it about 30 years ago for some minor prostate issues. After taking it for a year he said it had no effect on his hair regrowth. Do you think since it had no effect on my father, it will not effect me? I’m just a bit worried about giving it a shot after reading articles like this https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/finasteride-causes-physical-damage-to-nerves-depression-ed-steroid-imbalance.16979/#post-230383

It's for this reason that people can be quick to try any remedy that promises results. And we get it; those before-and-after photos will really get to you. The technology behind hair growth and anti-loss treatments has improved in recent years, too, though it's worth noting that some of these treatments can be expensive and unsustainable. Because not everyone can afford to drop 80 bucks on a bottle of growth supplements (or hundos on an in-office treatment), many people turn to natural and DIY alternatives.
Yes. Hyperandrogenism, a medical condition characterized by excessive production of male hormones called androgens, can cause hair loss in affected women. The most common cause of hyperandrogenism in women is functional ovarian hyperandrogenism, also known as polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition to hair loss, other signs include obesity, acne, and irregular menstruation, and it is one of the most common causes of infertility.
Some doctors prescribe Avodart off-label (meaning to treat something other than illnesses or conditions listed on the drug's label) to patients suffering from male-pattern baldness. Dutasteride, the active ingredient in Avodart, like finasteride, is used to treat enlarged prostate glands, but it blocks both types of the enzyme that create DHT, instead of just one. Studies show that dutasteride is superior to finasteride in treating AGA, but it has yet to be approved by the FDA for that purpose.
Alright, review time. Oh boy did this not work for me! I don't want to give this one star just based on it not working for me, I would rather give my story instead. I have always had thin hair. (Thanks Mom and dad!) Two years ago I started taking progesterone (hormones) and my hair started thinning. I stopped after 3 months and My hair continued to thin and never grew back. (Thanks Doc!) Last month I decided to try rogaine after it was recommended by a friend. (Thanks buddy!) That was probably the worst mistake of my life. In two weeks time 50% of my thin hair had fallen out. (I mean every time I would shampoo or brush, handfuls would fall out.) I followed the instructions to a T and prepared myself for the "shed". I had to stop after two weeks when I held a mirror up and could see bald spots in the back. (This isn't good.) After quitting the shedding has continued. (This could stop at any time.) It has now been a three weeks after quitting, and my hair has finally stopped falling out besides the normal hair loss. (Yay!) You can see my scalp through my hair at the top of my head. (Nooo.) The hair that is left up there is hiding bald spots. There isn't a style I can fix my hair into without seeing a bald spot. (Super sad face.) I was slightly depressed going into this about my hair, now I spend all day stressing about other people having to look at it. (I feel like Quasimodo!) So, besides the hair loss my scalp is super itchy, and I now have dandruff. Two things I never really had before. (The story gets even better!) Went to my family doctor. After he had the opportuniy to examine my hair, he said I looked like a chemo patient. (Again, thanks Doc!) I have started taking a vitamin regime of biotin, iron, and a hair-skin-nails pill. I haven't notice any new growth yet. I imagine it will be a while though. To sum up this experience as depressing is an understatement. I have cried many times but that won't bring any hair back unfortunately. (I haven't gone and looked at wigs yet.) To bring this story to an end I would like to say that it didn't work for me personally. If it works for you congratulations!
I’m 33 and I still have quite a full hair line. I was facing mild hair loss until recently I’m noticing a lot of shedding, I’ve been on Propecia for the past year though. I’m not sure if Propecia is not effective on me anymore or it was kind of limiting hair fall until now. I’m even doubting that it could be MPB but do you think The Big Three would also help even if it wasn’t an MPB case?
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
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