The follicles on the sides of the scalp are more genetically resistant to DHT, which is why male pattern baldness often results in a “crown” of hair. But its downsides are serious. “With women, finasteride is not an option,” says Dr. Wolfeld. “It’s not FDA-approved for women to take, so we don’t prescribe it.” In fact, due to the drug’s effect on hormone levels, pregnant women are advised to not even touch broken or crushed tablets.

Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.
The big three are still the best anti-hair loss regime for most men who just started losing their hair. They are safe, inexpensive, take little time to apply, and best of all, they work. However, If your hair is beyond the Norwood 3 scale, you might want to be looking into other solutions, like a hair transplant. The big three are much more effective at keeping your hair, not regrowing it.
Hi, great article. I have an aggressive form of MPB. I am 23 year old with a NW2 hairline, diffuse thinning over the top and crown. Been on 5% Minoxidil and 2% Keto for about 9 months. Went through a period of shedding which has reduced somewhat in the last couple of months. I don’t see any appreciable increase in density anywhere but I do see plenty of thin vellus hair at my hairline. I am waiting for the 1 year mark to see the full effect of this regime. Is there like a test you can do to assess hairfall? Or do we just have to count the hair lost in the shower? Do you reckon I should start the Fin to hold on the the hair I have? Like most guys (actually a bit more than most guys seeing that I am young) I worry a lot about being in the 2% who experience disastrous sides from Fin. I do plan to check my DHT levels before I start, if I do at all, to see if I naturally have high/low DHT. That should tell me what to expect, to an extent. 

My question would be, I am on the right track or is it overkill? I’ve read that using too much stuff (solutions or shampoo) maybe detrimental to keeping your hair. I know 6 month might be a little time but I still don’t see noticeable results and I’m afraid I might be doing something wrong or worsening the situation, even though I don’t have worse hair loss than before.

in clinical studies of mostly white women aged 18-45 years with mild to moderate degrees of hair loss, the following response to minoxidil topical solution 2% was reported: 19% of women reported moderate hair regrowth after using minoxidil topical solution 2% for 8 months (19% had moderate regrowth; 40% had minimal regrowth). This compares with 7% of women reporting moderate hair regrowth after using the placebo, the liquid without minoxidil in it, for 8 months (7% had moderate regrowth; 33% had minimal regrowth).
Hi, great article. I have an aggressive form of MPB. I am 23 year old with a NW2 hairline, diffuse thinning over the top and crown. Been on 5% Minoxidil and 2% Keto for about 9 months. Went through a period of shedding which has reduced somewhat in the last couple of months. I don’t see any appreciable increase in density anywhere but I do see plenty of thin vellus hair at my hairline. I am waiting for the 1 year mark to see the full effect of this regime. Is there like a test you can do to assess hairfall? Or do we just have to count the hair lost in the shower? Do you reckon I should start the Fin to hold on the the hair I have? Like most guys (actually a bit more than most guys seeing that I am young) I worry a lot about being in the 2% who experience disastrous sides from Fin. I do plan to check my DHT levels before I start, if I do at all, to see if I naturally have high/low DHT. That should tell me what to expect, to an extent.

It may seem a peculiar American vanity that men have in-boxes full of hair loss treatment offers and spend billions of dollars on hair loss treatments each year. Not so. As Gersh Kuntzman illustrates in his book Hair! Mankind's Historic Quest to End Baldness, chrome-dome anxiety has tormented us for ages. Caesar's laurel wreaths? Classic red herring, Kuntzman says.


During the trials on men with prostate problems, researchers noted an intriguing side effect: hair growth. Since finasteride had already been approved by the FDA to treat enlarged prostates in men, Merck decided to pursue the possibility of developing finasteride as the first pill to treat male pattern baldness. Minoxidil, a topical liquid solution, was already on the market (see below).

Men’s Rogaine Extra Strength Solution is the liquid version of our top pick. It didn’t make our final cut because it includes propylene glycol, which causes irritation in roughly one-third of its users. With that said, Dr. Wolfeld finds that it can be even more effective in practical daily use. In his experience, “the solution can penetrate and get into your scalp a little bit better” than the foam — especially if you’re not taking the time and effort to apply the foam correctly. This seems crazy to us since the foam so quickly dissolved into a liquid in our tests, but if you’re worried, try a one-month supply of the liquid and make the switch to foam if you notice any irritation.
Men’s Rogaine Extra Strength Solution is the liquid version of our top pick. It didn’t make our final cut because it includes propylene glycol, which causes irritation in roughly one-third of its users. With that said, Dr. Wolfeld finds that it can be even more effective in practical daily use. In his experience, “the solution can penetrate and get into your scalp a little bit better” than the foam — especially if you’re not taking the time and effort to apply the foam correctly. This seems crazy to us since the foam so quickly dissolved into a liquid in our tests, but if you’re worried, try a one-month supply of the liquid and make the switch to foam if you notice any irritation.
As with transplants, the word toupee conjures an outdated and disagreeable image. The 70s-style rugs have mostly been traded in for spiffier "hair replacement systems." But the basic concept -- a foreign object atop your head -- can only evolve so far. Of course, the effectiveness of hairpieces is tough to evaluate. You may spot an awful one now and then, but the ones you do spot are just the awful ones. Who knows how many masterpieces slip undetected under the radar?
Like minoxidil, finasteride, the active ingredient in Propecia, was originally created with a different purpose in mind -- to treat enlarged prostate glands -- and researchers observed it came with a side effect of hair growth. Unlike topical minoxidil, finasteride requires a prescription, is taken orally and addresses hormonal causes of hair loss. It inhibits the enzyme type II 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into DHT. As it was the first truly effective treatment for hair loss that provided nearly guaranteed results, finasteride revolutionized the hair-loss-treatment industry.

In the past few years, medicine has made tremendous strides in the treatment of men's hair loss. With the advent of 5-alpha-reductace inhibitors such as Propecia and the evolution of surgical hair restoration, living with noticeable hair loss is no longer inevitable. For the first time in the history it is now possible to stop or slow the progression of hair loss and to replace lost hair through surgery with completely natural results.

Finally, if these tests come back normal, your dermatologist may suggest a scalp biopsy of a couple of two-millimeter sections taken from your scalp under local anesthesia ($400 and up). It can determine whether genetic hair loss, telogen effluvium (a condition in which hair falls out from stress or rapid weight gain), or a disease (such as lupus) is the cause of your shedding, and your dermatologist can treat you accordingly.


If a pregnant woman comes in contact with crushed or broken Finasteride tablets, wash the contact area right away with soap and water. If a woman who is pregnant comes into contact with the active ingredient in Finasteride, a healthcare provider should be consulted. If a woman who is pregnant with a male baby swallows or comes in contact with the medicine in Finasteride, the male baby may be born with sex organs that are not normal.
Whether experiencing hair loss due to genetics, stress, vitamin deficiencies, male pattern baldness, or any other reason, the above ten hair loss treatments for men can help men take control over their lives and confidence once again while regrowing and maintaining healthy hair. No matter what the cause of hair loss may be, balding can be an embarrassing and troublesome issue. Each product listed in this review has its own unique properties, so there truly is something that will work for everyone, regardless of the type of hair loss, budget, skin type, and needs. Men can depend on these high-quality products, as they are the ten best hair growth products for men in 2018.
Thank you. This has been the most helpful article I have read! Very much appreciated! Last question (I won’t bug you with anymore after this) . . . I was tested by my doctor and came out perfectly healthy so it is either stress or MPB. My job is extremely stressful so it could be that but I have no way or knowing for sure. As such, do you think there is any harm on me taking finasteride even if it isn’t MPB and is just stress? I suppose if the medicine didn’t work, I would know it was stress and not MPB. Also, I assume this is something I would continue to take for life right?
One common side effect of minoxidil is a red, itchy scalp, but users claim that merely switching brands can sometimes alleviate that symptom. Another possible side effect is excess hair growth in unwanted places, including the face. It is important to point out that unwanted hair growth and other side effects go away once treatment is discontinued.
"I recommend that everyone [with any hair loss] take finasteride," says Robert M. Bernstein, MD. Bernstein is associate clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University and founder of the Bernstein Medical Center for Hair Restoration. "To patients who are younger,” he says, “I also recommend minoxidil. But the mainstay is finasteride. The data show that, over five years, it significantly retards hair loss in 85% of users."
Men's Rogaine Extra Strength Hair Regrowth Treatment (5 percent minoxidil) boasts impressive hair growth rates, slowing hair loss for the vast majority of men who use it diligently. The hair-loss treatment is available over the counter and leads to only minimal side effects, all of which go away when treatment is discontinued. See our full review »
That meant new products like Hims and Keeps were out.Hims and Keeps are relatively new companies that allow you to set up a subscription for hair loss treatments. Both offer finasteride (after an online consultation with a doctor) or 5 percent minoxidil. However, their minoxidil solutions contain propylene glycol, so we cut them from consideration.
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