Regrow thicker, beautiful hair with Women's ROGAINE® Hair Regrowth Treatment, Once-a-Day Foam. Containing 5% minoxidil, this foam reactivates hair follicles to regrow hair. The only once-daily hair regrowth treatment for women approved by the FDA, this formula is proven to help regrow hair in 81%* of women, with clinical results in as little as 12 weeks and visible results with continuous daily use after 24 weeks. From the #1 dermatologist recommended brand, the once-a-day applied foam can fit into your regular beauty routine. This package of Women's ROGAINE® Foam includes one 60-gram can, a 2-month supply.
I’m 33 years old. I’ve been using Finasteride (1mg) for over 3+ years now, and it really stopped my hair loss. I say I’m a living proof of the effectiveness of this drug. And yes it really lowered my libido. But then in these past days, I felt this pain around my testicles. Then my leg became partly numb. I tried to experiment on how to stop the pain and numbness by stopping Finasteride for a while. Sequentially, the pain and the numbness went away after stopping it. I’m afraid of coming back on drinking Finasteride again.
This article is COMPREHENSIVE and sticks to the tried and tested (read scientifically proven) treatment methods. For me, if you’re suffering from pattern baldness, then the best chance you have is the Big Three. That said, it is worth potentially trying other, more natural, treatments if your hair loss isn’t aggressive and if you have an aversion to medicated products. I’m not talking about snake oil here. There are some treatments out there that, while not a primary treatment mode, can help to at least arrest hair loss in milder cases. As always with hair loss it’s a question of probabilities. I don’t think I’ve come across a product that works 100% of the time for 100% of the people. But the best chance undoubtedly comes with the FDA approved products to date. Also loved the future pipeline chart. Fantastic view of what will (hopefully) be more effective treatments in the future.
Thanks for the help Domen. I currently use keto about once a week but I will ramp up to 3 times a week. I hear that helps for Sebum reduction. Do you agree? In terms of shedding, I shed very consistently . . . .about 15-20 hairs I notice in the shower when I shampoo, 15 hairs when i come out of the shower and comb my hair, another 5 every morning on my pillow and random hairs throughout the day that I notice on my desk.
2. Oil-rich conditioner. “Oils improve hair’s tensile strength,” says Paradi Mirmirani, a hair-loss specialist and dermatologist in Vallejo, California. In other words, oils make hair less likely to break under pressure, which is especially important for thinning hair that’s prone to snapping when brushed or styled. Mirmirani recommends using a conditioner fortified with natural oils, like Burt’s Bees Very Volumizing Pomegranate Conditioner, which contains avocado oil ($8), or Honest Company Conditioner with coconut oil ($10). That one’s got an added benefit: “Coconut oil has been shown to penetrate hair,” says cosmetic chemist Randy Schueller, so it makes your hair stronger from the inside out. (Just don’t load up on pure coconut oil. “You might overshampoo your hair to get it out, and then you’ll end up drying your hair and undoing any benefit,” says Fusco.)
For those concerned that the existing treatments lack a certain sci-fi quality, behold the Laser Comb. The Laser Comb recently became only the third hair loss treatment to receive FDA approval. And it is the first that doesn’t use drugs or surgery. By stimulating follicles with a low-level laser, the hand-held device was shown in test trials to increase hair volume in a majority of patients.
“There’s people selling pills and creams and lotions and whatever else, and sometimes you can’t even trust what ingredients they have in there,” he warned us when we spoke to him over the phone. Key takeaway: The hair loss industry is crazy dishonest, so we eliminated any treatments (especially homeopathic methods) that aren’t based in concrete, peer-reviewed science.

Topical treatments like Rogaine use the active ingredient minoxidil -- originally used to treat high blood pressure. After researchers discovered that it also promoted hair growth, it was the first drug approved by the FDA to treat male pattern baldness. It is used topically on the scalp, and the success of treatment is dependent on the user's extent of hair loss. Researchers at the AHLA find its efficacy to be marginal in the long run since it has no effect on the hormonal process. 
I’m 33 years old. I’ve been using Finasteride (1mg) for over 3+ years now, and it really stopped my hair loss. I say I’m a living proof of the effectiveness of this drug. And yes it really lowered my libido. But then in these past days, I felt this pain around my testicles. Then my leg became partly numb. I tried to experiment on how to stop the pain and numbness by stopping Finasteride for a while. Sequentially, the pain and the numbness went away after stopping it. I’m afraid of coming back on drinking Finasteride again.
If you believe you are beginning to lose your hair at an abnormal speed, you ought to start taking preventive measures so as to make sure that it remains from getting worse. Hair only grows about half an inch a month, therefore it takes some time to find those eight-12 inches required to donate. Falling hair is a somewhat common ailment which affects a massive amount of people.
Side effects and concerns: Around the time new hair growth starts, some women experience folliculitis (inflammation of the follicle). This minor complication can be treated with compresses and antibiotics. A more serious hazard is shock loss, the sudden loss of hair that normally grows in the area of the transplant. Shock loss affects 30% to 50% of female hair-transplant recipients; fortunately, the loss is usually temporary, and the hair will regrow. One drawback is that there's a finite amount of donor hair, and it may not be enough to fill in the transplant site as densely as before, especially if the area of thinning hair is large. A transplant procedure can cost from $4,000 to $15,000 and is rarely covered by insurance.
Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.
The Rogaine rep we spoke to explained that the different packaging (and therefore different prices) has to do with the FDA-approval process: “We discovered in clinical trials that the hair loss patterns between men and women are different,” she said by way of explanation. “Men typically have that bald spot on the crown of their head, where women generally have a general thinning throughout, but concentrated more on the top of the head. So for FDA approval, we had to come up with two different, gender-specific products, so the directions were more explanatory.”

Men's Rogaine Extra Strength Hair Regrowth Treatment (5 percent minoxidil) boasts impressive hair growth rates, slowing hair loss for the vast majority of men who use it diligently. The hair-loss treatment is available over the counter and leads to only minimal side effects, all of which go away when treatment is discontinued. See our full review »
The easy-to-use spray bottle allows you to apply the serum directly to your scalp, or you can spray it onto your hands to rub into parts of your scalp. Each bottle offers a three month supply and should be used twice daily. It has outstanding reviews online, partly because it does not leave a sticky residue or cause preliminary hair shedding like most other regrowth treatments.
Alright, review time. Oh boy did this not work for me! I don't want to give this one star just based on it not working for me, I would rather give my story instead. I have always had thin hair. (Thanks Mom and dad!) Two years ago I started taking progesterone (hormones) and my hair started thinning. I stopped after 3 months and My hair continued to thin and never grew back. (Thanks Doc!) Last month I decided to try rogaine after it was recommended by a friend. (Thanks buddy!) That was probably the worst mistake of my life. In two weeks time 50% of my thin hair had fallen out. (I mean every time I would shampoo or brush, handfuls would fall out.) I followed the instructions to a T and prepared myself for the "shed". I had to stop after two weeks when I held a mirror up and could see bald spots in the back. (This isn't good.) After quitting the shedding has continued. (This could stop at any time.) It has now been a three weeks after quitting, and my hair has finally stopped falling out besides the normal hair loss. (Yay!) You can see my scalp through my hair at the top of my head. (Nooo.) The hair that is left up there is hiding bald spots. There isn't a style I can fix my hair into without seeing a bald spot. (Super sad face.) I was slightly depressed going into this about my hair, now I spend all day stressing about other people having to look at it. (I feel like Quasimodo!) So, besides the hair loss my scalp is super itchy, and I now have dandruff. Two things I never really had before. (The story gets even better!) Went to my family doctor. After he had the opportuniy to examine my hair, he said I looked like a chemo patient. (Again, thanks Doc!) I have started taking a vitamin regime of biotin, iron, and a hair-skin-nails pill. I haven't notice any new growth yet. I imagine it will be a while though. To sum up this experience as depressing is an understatement. I have cried many times but that won't bring any hair back unfortunately. (I haven't gone and looked at wigs yet.) To bring this story to an end I would like to say that it didn't work for me personally. If it works for you congratulations!
The main type of hair loss in both sexes — and the subject of this article — is androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Almost all hair loss in guys results from male-pattern baldness, a genetic trait that comes from your parents. Other causes include certain medications, too much vitamin A, or not enough protein. Illness or stress can lead to sudden, heavy shedding called telogen effluvium. Good news, though: Hair loss that isn’t from male-pattern baldness often reverses itself.
Again, you’ll want to visit your doctor to get a blood test to check your levels in these vitamins. For example, women who have iron levels lower than 70 nanograms per milliliter are considered deficient. From there, work with your doctor to find an appropriate dose according to your deficiency level. Excessive or unnecessary supplementation can be dangerous.

Keranique® Hair Regrowth System is CLINICALLY PROVEN and designed for women’s unique hair needs. We know you’ll love it, but if for any reason you're not completely satisfied, just call within 120 days of receipt, return the product as instructed, and you'll get a FULL REFUND of the purchase price (less s&p), even if the products are empty. Click ORDER NOW to take advantage of our Special TV Offer!
Coming in at number 7 is the tablet formulation from Research Verified. This tablet formulation contains a mixture of multi-vitamin blends and trusted compounds known to promote hair growth and prevent future hair fall. The product is manufactured in US FDA certified labs ensuring high quality. Containing active ingredients such as Saw Palmetto and Ginkgo biloba, help promote natural and lustrous hair regrowth.
I have been on Proscar now (1.25mg/day) for nearly 10 months, rogaine foam 1 to 2 days a time and Nizoral shampoo a few times a week. unfortunately, the shedding never stopped. When I shower, I still see 10-15 hairs on my hand when I shampoo and another 5-10 after I comb my hair after I shower . . . and then another 10-15 when I style my hair with gel in the mornings. I’m going to switch to name brand Propecia and try that out for a few months but I think I may just not responding to this treatment. My hair is absolutely more thin than it was before I started treatment. My thinking is that I go another 3 months on name brand propecia and if that doesn’t work, try Avordart. Thoughts?

Reality is, if finasterise is so safe, why doesn’t merk market this drug as a vaccine for hair loss? For every man north of 18 to take this drug to prevent the possibility of balding? It’s safe, so why not? Truth is the science isn’t clear that either AR inhibition or DHT reduction is safe. All we know is that merk did a study and were able to publish data that suits their agenda.
I’ve looked into taking finasteride. My father was prescribed it about 30 years ago for some minor prostate issues. After taking it for a year he said it had no effect on his hair regrowth. Do you think since it had no effect on my father, it will not effect me? I’m just a bit worried about giving it a shot after reading articles like this https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/finasteride-causes-physical-damage-to-nerves-depression-ed-steroid-imbalance.16979/#post-230383
There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
Thank you. This has been the most helpful article I have read! Very much appreciated! Last question (I won’t bug you with anymore after this) . . . I was tested by my doctor and came out perfectly healthy so it is either stress or MPB. My job is extremely stressful so it could be that but I have no way or knowing for sure. As such, do you think there is any harm on me taking finasteride even if it isn’t MPB and is just stress? I suppose if the medicine didn’t work, I would know it was stress and not MPB. Also, I assume this is something I would continue to take for life right?
The big three are still the best anti-hair loss regime for most men who just started losing their hair. They are safe, inexpensive, take little time to apply, and best of all, they work. However, If your hair is beyond the Norwood 3 scale, you might want to be looking into other solutions, like a hair transplant. The big three are much more effective at keeping your hair, not regrowing it.
For those concerned that the existing treatments lack a certain sci-fi quality, behold the Laser Comb. The Laser Comb recently became only the third hair loss treatment to receive FDA approval. And it is the first that doesn’t use drugs or surgery. By stimulating follicles with a low-level laser, the hand-held device was shown in test trials to increase hair volume in a majority of patients.
P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.
Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research confirmed that a 2% solution of minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. How it works is still not clear. Two double-blind studies of women ages 18 to 45 demonstrated its effectiveness. In one study, 13% of female minoxidil users had moderate hair growth, and 50%, minimal growth (compared with 6% and 33%, respectively, in the placebo group). In the second study, 60% of women in the minoxidil group reported new hair growth, compared with 40% in the placebo group. As a result of these studies and others, over-the-counter 2% minoxidil is FDA-approved for treating androgenetic alopecia in women.
Men may also experience some sexual and emotional side effects while taking it: In a study published in the June 2011 issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, Dr. Michael Irwig of George Washington University found as many as 92 percent of test subjects reporting problems in the bedroom. The study also reported that “the mean duration of finasteride use was 28 months and the mean duration of persistent sexual side effects was 40 months,” meaning that side effects lingered long after subjects stopped taking the pill.
Once male-pattern baldness starts, it’s not going to stop until every last hair on your head has shrunk or shed, though the rate at which this happens differs from person to person and depends on genetics. And since the grind of hair loss is unending, it’s important to start treatment as soon as your hairline starts bothering you. If you’re looking for a more quantitative metric, Dr. Paul McAndrews, clinical professor of dermatology at the USC School of Medicine and member of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, assures me that “you have to lose half your hair before the human eye can tell.” (Of course, if you don’t care about losing your hair and are fine with going full Prince William and shaving your head, go for it. We’ve got some recommendations for razors and hair trimmers to help you out on that front.)
In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
Cyproterone acetate is not available in the U.S. Doctors consider it one of the last resorts for treating female pattern hair loss because of its possible toxicity and long-term side effects. As with any drug, side effects other than those listed on the package may occur. Contact your doctor if you notice a side effect that is unusual or particularly bothersome.
1. Collagen powder. Preliminary studies suggest that marine-sourced collagen may stimulate hair growth, says New York City dermatologist Yoon-Soo Cindy Bae. Though more research is needed, participants in studies reported thicker hair after three to six months of daily use. Crushed Tonic Original Powder ($105) easily mixes into coffee, tea, and water.

"This is an oral, prescription-only medication with the brand name Propecia that’s also FDA approved to treat hair loss," says Spencer. Male pattern hair loss occurs when a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) prevents hair follicles from getting the nutrients they need. Finasteride works by blocking the production of DHT, which protects the follicles.
×