Many physicians recommend that patients engage in a combination therapy that includes minoxidil and Propecia (Est. $75 per 1-month supply) with prescription. Propecia is an oral medication with finasteride being the active ingredient. Finasteride was originally developed by Merck to treat enlarged prostate glands. Excess hair growth was a surprise side effect of the drug and led to the development of Propecia, which was approved by the FDA for treatment of male-pattern baldness in 1997. It has not been approved for women.
Though, it is important to point out that a lot of these companies are developing procedures that involve implanting hair, which means there is a chance they will be expensive — as we mentioned before, traditional hair transplants are costly. But a few companies and products such as Follicum’s FOL-S-005 and Fidia Pharma’s Brotzu Lotion are being designed as topical treatments.
NuNutrients Advanced is a potent serum that works at the root of hair loss. It revitalizes hair follicles, helps reduce hair loss, and reduces inflammation, while regrowing hair by reducing the level of DHT (which can degrade hair follicles and inflame the skin). Voted a #1 trusted brand in 2013 and 2014, this effective treatment uses Biochanin A (extracted from Red Clover) to produce results that can’t be achieved with other products. Biochanin A is a natural inhibitor of DHT, subdues hair loss, and modulates free radical damage to the skin and scalp. This helps the hair stay rooted much longer, while increasing the size of the hair follicle for better volume. It also uses Acetyl Tetrapeptide-3 Biomimetic peptides to stimulate the extracellular matrix proteins for stronger hair anchoring. It also prevents hair from falling out and improves the scalp’s health, while adding more volume and increasing the size of the hair follicle.
P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.
Just letting go is possibly the most challenging of the available options. It’s also the cheapest and ultimately the most effective in the struggle with hair loss. Given the imperfections of surgical, medical, and technological options, there are many who advocate simple acceptance. (BaldRUs.com is one of several sites devoted to embracing the scalp's natural fate.) What's more, the health benefits of happier mirror time -- and fewer years of harmful anxiety -- just might offset the loss of those Samson-like powers.
1. Minoxidil. It’s the only FDA-approved topical nonprescription medication that can claim to regrow hair — and it should be part of any hair-loss plan if you have serious thinning, says Rogers. Minoxidil has loads of research to back it, but it requires commitment. If you quit using it, your hair will start to lose ground again. Use a 5 percent strength, like Women’s Rogaine 5% Minoxidil Foam ($30), once daily to see results in three to four months, says Rogers.

“While nutritious eating isn’t going to bring your hair back by any means, eating plenty of protein-rich foods and healthy fats can make the hair that you still have look thicker and shinier.” Skimping on the B vitamins in particular can interfere with the formation of hair cells and, therefore, hair growth. The best sources of Bs are protein-packed foods like chicken, fish, eggs, and pork, as well as leafy greens such as spinach. (These foods are also good for melting belly fat, so it’s a win win).
2. Volumizing shampoos and treatments. Typically, these work by depositing ingredients, like wheat protein and keratin, that adhere to the hair shaft to a) thicken it and b) create spaces between hairs so you look like you have more of it. Try Kiehl’s Rice & Wheat Volumizing Shampoo ($18) with hydrolyzed wheat protein; Rogers likes Redken Cerafill Defy Shampoo and Conditioner ($20 each) with ceramides that bulk up hair.
Castor oil, as some might already know, is one of the most popular all-natural "panaceas." Go ahead, Google it: What you'll find is article after article about how the viscous oil can help with shedding, breakage, and regrowth. But unlike rosemary oil and vitamin B5, both of which have studies that back up their aid in hair growth, scientific evidence surrounding castor oil is lacking. (Any testimonials about castor oil for hair growth are anecdotal, coming mostly from blogs, Reddit, and YouTube.)
Am an Af/Am women 49y.o. almost 50 in a week. Anyway, last april, I removed a weave and saw that around the perimeter of my hairline the hair was so thin, it was virtually bald. I presumed it was due to the weave rubbing against my fine hair; but I later reviewed pictures over the past 8 years and saw how my hair had progressively thinned. My sister and mother confirmed that despite my youthful appearance, the hair thining was likely genetic. I am a can do kinda girl so I sought options. Was evening considering hair replacement "Bosley-style". Long story a little shorter, I boutht this Equate Hair Regrowth after reading just about all of the reviews. Worse thing that could happen was NOTHING, so I would be exactly where I was...thining disappearing hair at the edges. I have used the Equate Hair Regrowth since April 2013 and the hair has regrown around the perimeter and I couldn't be more pleased. I bought for my elder sister 56 y.o. and she had significantly more hair-loss, almost bald edges in fact; now she too has experienced regrowth and was so pleased she recommended it to my mother 74 y.o. and I bought it for her also (she will start applying by the end of the week). Highly recommend this product and note that I have also been taking biotin supplements since April 2013. So, buy Equate Hair Regrowth and biotin for best results. Price can't be beat. Excellent
The most unique ingredient in this tablet formulation is solubilized keratin. It is a breakthrough supplement proven to help reduce hair loss and promote regrowth. The tablets also contains a blend of 23 essential vitamins essential for micro-circulation of blood within the roots of the hair. The product is suitable for both men and women and has been shown to effectively combat the balding.
Clearly, minoxidil is not a miracle drug. While it can produce some new growth of fine hair in some — not all — women, it can't restore the full density of the lost hair. It's not a quick fix, either. You won't see results until you use the drug for two months. The effect often peaks at around four months, but it could take longer, so plan on a trial of six to 12 months. If minoxidil works for you, you'll need to keep using it to maintain those results. If you stop, you'll start to lose hair again.
A few studies support the use of red ginseng, sometimes called panax ginseng (about $25), for hair regrowth. It can have an anti-apoptotic effect on the hair, Rogers says, meaning it slows cell death so hair follicles can grow for a longer period of time. But before taking any of these supplements, it’s important to consult your doctor; a lab test can confirm whether you need a particular supplement or if taking it will just be a waste of time and money.
3. Nutriceuticals. Rogers recommends that her patients try Viviscal Dietary Supplements ($50 for a one-month supply) or Nutrafol ($88 for a one-month supply), both of which can often be picked up in a salon. The former contains marine-based proteins meant to beef up thinning hair. The latter is packed with antioxidants, like ashwagandha and curcumin, and boasts impressive clinical results.
Results from clinical studies of mostly white women ages 18 to 45 years with mild to moderate degrees of hair loss report that after using minoxidil for eight months, 19% of users had moderate regrowth and 40% had minimal regrowth. Of those using a liquid without active minoxidil (a placebo) during the same time period, 7% reported moderate hair regrowth while 33% had minimal regrowth.
The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
Hair loss comes in different forms. Whether hair loss is caused by genetics or a traumatic life event, it can take a huge toll on one's self-esteem. The vast amount of hair-loss products available can make it difficult to discern what works and what doesn't. We poured over dozens of user and owner reviews and clinical studies to bring you a definitive list of the top hair-loss products on the market.
We spend so much time and money piling on the products that it’s easy to forget where hair growth starts: namely, your scalp. A simple way to stimulate hair growth at home is to give yourself a scalp massage—this will increase blood flow to your scalp, enhance the strength of your roots, and help nutrients get to your follicle faster. You can give yourself a scalp massage with dry hair, but adding a nutrient-rich oil to the mix will only double the benefits (just keep it to once a week if you have oily roots). Rosemary oil, in particular, has been used for centuries to stimulate hair growth. It dilates blood vessels and, in turn, stimulates your follicle to produce new growth.
According to practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, hair health is tied to two things: kidney energy and the blood, which nourish the hair. The solution: acupuncture and Chinese herbs. While there isn't a lot of hard science to back this up, Maureen Conant, a TCM practitioner at Full Bloom Acupuncture in Seattle, says that she's seen women's hair stop falling out and then gradually regenerate after a few months of weekly treatments.
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