Hi, great article. I have an aggressive form of MPB. I am 23 year old with a NW2 hairline, diffuse thinning over the top and crown. Been on 5% Minoxidil and 2% Keto for about 9 months. Went through a period of shedding which has reduced somewhat in the last couple of months. I don’t see any appreciable increase in density anywhere but I do see plenty of thin vellus hair at my hairline. I am waiting for the 1 year mark to see the full effect of this regime. Is there like a test you can do to assess hairfall? Or do we just have to count the hair lost in the shower? Do you reckon I should start the Fin to hold on the the hair I have? Like most guys (actually a bit more than most guys seeing that I am young) I worry a lot about being in the 2% who experience disastrous sides from Fin. I do plan to check my DHT levels before I start, if I do at all, to see if I naturally have high/low DHT. That should tell me what to expect, to an extent.
Am an Af/Am women 49y.o. almost 50 in a week. Anyway, last april, I removed a weave and saw that around the perimeter of my hairline the hair was so thin, it was virtually bald. I presumed it was due to the weave rubbing against my fine hair; but I later reviewed pictures over the past 8 years and saw how my hair had progressively thinned. My sister and mother confirmed that despite my youthful appearance, the hair thining was likely genetic. I am a can do kinda girl so I sought options. Was evening considering hair replacement "Bosley-style". Long story a little shorter, I boutht this Equate Hair Regrowth after reading just about all of the reviews. Worse thing that could happen was NOTHING, so I would be exactly where I was...thining disappearing hair at the edges. I have used the Equate Hair Regrowth since April 2013 and the hair has regrown around the perimeter and I couldn't be more pleased. I bought for my elder sister 56 y.o. and she had significantly more hair-loss, almost bald edges in fact; now she too has experienced regrowth and was so pleased she recommended it to my mother 74 y.o. and I bought it for her also (she will start applying by the end of the week). Highly recommend this product and note that I have also been taking biotin supplements since April 2013. So, buy Equate Hair Regrowth and biotin for best results. Price can't be beat. Excellent
Sure, you can easily pop a hair growth supplement, but honestly, the word's still out on whether or not they're an effective way to help your hair grow faster. Plus, they can contain unnecessary large amounts of minerals and vitamins (ahem, biotin) which can actually wreak havoc in other ways (ahem, breakouts). Thus, eating your way to longer hair is actually a smarter, nutritionist-approved way to make your hair grow faster. Vitamins and minerals occurring naturally in foods are easier for your body to utilize, and they'll naturally deliver a healthier ratio of nutrients—just the way Mother Nature intended. 

In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.


In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant.
The other main hair-loss treatment that was recommended by all four dermatologists I interviewed is finasteride, often called by its brand name Propecia. This FDA-approved medication is only available with a prescription, but these days, it’s found as a generic and ordered online after a virtual consultation, through start-ups like Hims, Keeps, and Lemonaid.
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